New Whitepaper Takes a Deep Dive into the Future of Wireless Networks

New Whitepaper Takes a Deep Dive into the Future of Wireless Networks

Today there are more than 8 billion connected devices in the world: everything from cell phones and tablets to smart electric meters and smart sensors specific to industries like transportation, healthcare and facilities management.

While that number might seem staggering, the amount of devices that make up the Internet of Things (IoT) is expected to rapidly grow in the coming years: Gartner predicts that 20.8 billion devices will be connected to the Internet by 2020.¹

This surge in mobile smart device use is connecting us like never before but also requires networks to be better, faster and provide more coverage. This all boils down to the fact that networks need more bandwidth to keep up with today’s—and tomorrow’s—demands for faster, better data transmission.

Our latest whitepaper, “Future of Mobile Networks,” explores how wireless carriers are meeting the need for better, faster and more widely-available coverage and what this means for fleets like yours.

 

Expanding LTE and Sunsetting CDMA

One of the ways carriers are evolving to improve connectivity is through continued investment in Long Term Evolution (LTE) networks, which provide faster and more comprehensive coverage.

To continue investing in LTE, carriers must reallocate their portion of the spectrum from existing Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) and Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) to LTE networks, rather than maintaining lagging, obsolete networks that cannot accommodate new technology and faster speeds.

U.S. carriers will begin to repurpose CDMA and GSM networks beginning in 2019, and other carriers in 2020 and beyond. This transition has already taken place for much of Canada, starting with Western Ontario in 2015, followed by Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan in 2017.

Networks will degrade CDMA in stages, so large areas of coverage may disappear at any time. It’s hard to say how long a CDMA customer will have reliable coverage, but users will start to feel the pain well before the final switch is turned off.

 

Ensuring Your Fleet’s Connectivity Today and in the Future

Starting in 2017, Trimble was the first major telematics company to provide 4G LTE connectivity in the North American trucking industry. With LTE connectivity, Trimble customers can not only realize faster connection speeds through a better network, but eliminate the risk of losing connectivity when CDMA and GSM networks disappear.

Interested in learning more about the benefits of upgrading your fleet to LTE? Contact us today to see how we can help you maximize your driver and vehicle connectivity to help reach new levels of safety and efficiency.

New Whitepaper Takes a Deep Dive into the Future of Wireless Networks

Today there are more than 8 billion connected devices in the world: everything from cell phones and tablets to smart electric meters and smart sensors specific to industries like transportation, healthcare and facilities management.

While that number might seem staggering, the amount of devices that make up the Internet of Things (IoT) is expected to rapidly grow in the coming years: Gartner predicts that 20.8 billion devices will be connected to the Internet by 2020.¹

This surge in mobile smart device use is connecting us like never before but also requires networks to be better, faster and provide more coverage. This all boils down to the fact that networks need more bandwidth to keep up with today’s—and tomorrow’s—demands for faster, better data transmission.

Our latest whitepaper, “Future of Mobile Networks,” explores how wireless carriers are meeting the need for better, faster and more widely-available coverage and what this means for fleets like yours.

 

Expanding LTE and Sunsetting CDMA

One of the ways carriers are evolving to improve connectivity is through continued investment in Long Term Evolution (LTE) networks, which provide faster and more comprehensive coverage.

To continue investing in LTE, carriers must reallocate their portion of the spectrum from existing Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) and Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) to LTE networks, rather than maintaining lagging, obsolete networks that cannot accommodate new technology and faster speeds.

U.S. carriers will begin to repurpose CDMA and GSM networks beginning in 2019, and other carriers in 2020 and beyond. This transition has already taken place for much of Canada, starting with Western Ontario in 2015, followed by Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan in 2017.

Networks will degrade CDMA in stages, so large areas of coverage may disappear at any time. It’s hard to say how long a CDMA customer will have reliable coverage, but users will start to feel the pain well before the final switch is turned off.

 

Ensuring Your Fleet’s Connectivity Today and in the Future

Starting in 2017, Trimble was the first major telematics company to provide 4G LTE connectivity in the North American trucking industry. With LTE connectivity, Trimble customers can not only realize faster connection speeds through a better network, but eliminate the risk of losing connectivity when CDMA and GSM networks disappear.

Interested in learning more about the benefits of upgrading your fleet to LTE? Contact us today to see how we can help you maximize your driver and vehicle connectivity to help reach new levels of safety and efficiency.

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